DIV / REL 6901 Fundamentals of Preaching

Kashif Graham

Kashif Graham's picture
Kashif Graham
Contact:
Suite 214-B
419 21st Avenue S
Nashville, TN, 37240
(615) 875-3494

What is a source?

Primary sources originate in the time period that historians are studying. They vary a great deal. They may include personal memiors, goverment documents, transcriptions of legal proceedings, oral histories and traditions, archeaeological and biological evidence, visual sources like paintings and photographs.

William Kelleher Storey, Writing History: A Guide for Students (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), p. 18.

Secondary works reflect on earlier times. Typically, they are books and articles by writers who are interpreting the events and primary sources [and other secondary sources] you are studying.

William Kelleher Storey, Writing History: A Guide for Students (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), p. 18.

Reference material that summarizes and condenses the information found in primary and secondary sources.  (e.g., frequently almanacs, bibliographies, chronologies; dictionaries and encyclopedias, textbooks)

Christine Bombaro, Finding History: Research Methods and Resources for Students and Scholars (Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2012), p. 57

In some cases the distinction between primary and secondary source works may be confusing. If you are writing about historical writers, you may find yourself using a secondary work as a primary source. For example, during the 1840s and 1850s Thomas Macaulay wrote The History of England. His book describes the origins and outcome of England's Glorious Revolution of 1688. For historians of seventeenth-century England, Macaulay's book is a classic secondary work. But for historians of Victorian Britian [c. 1837-1901], The History of England is a rich primary source that tells historians a great deal about intellectual life in the 1840s and 1850s.

William Kelleher Storey, Writing History: A Guide for Students (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), p. 19.

Interdisciplinary Resources

Search our catalog!

 

Keyword vs. Subject Searching

Step 1:  Start your search process by brainstorming a list of keywords that describe the main concepts of your topic or question.

Step 2:  Use these keywords for your initial searches.

Step 3:  Use the Subject Heading links in the Library Catalog record to refine your search.

Requesting materials from other libraries:

  • Illiad For articles, books,videos, dissertations, etc.
  • WorldCat (OCLC) For everything except articles. WorldCat contains more than 1 billion records describing items owned by over 10,000 libraries worldwide. Each record indicates library holdings and contains a "Request this item in ILLiad" link

 

Print Commentaries

Matthew (BS2570 - 2575)

Mark (BS2580 - 2585)

Acts (BS2620 - 2625)

Romans (2660 - 2665)