Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Bisexuality-Pansexuality Resources

Bisexual/pansexual+ individuals are students, faculty, staff, library colleagues, community members - family & friends. 

This guide shares information that can help you learn about and be more supportive of members of the bisexual/pansexual+ communities.
Graph showing Bisexuals make up over 50% of LGBT community - Gary J. Gates, Williams Institute report

  • Bisexual+ people make up the majority of the LGBTQ community, but receive less than 1% of all funding that supports LGBTQ advocacy.
  • They experience significantly higher rates of physical, sexual, social, and emotional violence and disparities than gay and straight people, as well as poorer physical, mental, and social health.
  • Despite comprising over half of the LGBTQ community, only 29% of people report personally knowing a bisexual person, compared to 73% of people who report knowing a gay or lesbian person.
  • The bisexual+ community includes a wide variety and many intersections of identities. Our community is at its healthiest when we are inclusive and affirming of everyone under the bi+ umbrella, and discrimination against BIPOC, transgender and those living with disabilities within the bi+ community has been eliminated.

Statistics from the Bisexual Resource Center's Bisexual+ Health Awareness Month (#bihealthmonth) Shareable Campaign Information.

Edited March 2022 by Melinda Brown

This guide originally created for "The B in LGBT is Not Silent: Supporting Bisexual/Pansexual+ College Students", Roundtable Discussion held at ACRL 2019: Recasting the Narrative, Cleveland, OH. Moderated by Melinda Brown, Deborah Lilton & AJ Robinson.

Friendly URL: http://bit.ly/acrl_bi

  Robyn Ochs holding microphone & smiling. June 25, 2016. Salem, MA. North Shore Pride Parade and Festival 2016. © 2016 Marilyn Humphries

Widely Used Definition of Bisexuality: "I call myself bisexual because I acknowledge that I have in myself the potential to be attracted - romantically and/or sexually - to people of more than one sex and/or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way, and not necessarily to the same degree. Activist - Robyn Ochs

The Bisexual Umbrella by Shiri Eisner